• The number of patients admitted to Alegent Creighton Health Creighton University Medical Center's Trauma Center has jumped 25 percent, from 1,179 in 2008 to 1,477 in 2012.

  • Falls are the number one reason for trauma admissions. Motor vehicle collisions are second, and gunshot wounds are third.

  • Seriously injured patients taken to hospitals by medical helicopter are 16 percent more likely to survive than those with similar injuries brought in by ground ambulance, Read Why Fly? 

  • Creighton Univeristy Medical Center was the ninth hospital in the country to have medical helicopter service. Read the history of how it started 

  • Many car accidents involve drunk drivers. One national study found that Nebraska has the third highest rate of drunk drivers in the country. And the Douglas County Health Department reports southwest Omaha may be the single most dangerous spot in the metro. Eleven percent of those surveyed admit to having too much to drink and driving home anyway. That's more than three times the national average and almost twice the number in the metro who admit driving drunk (5.8 percent).

  • Some patients end up at CUMC after being attacked by... cows. The trauma team saw almost 100 animal-related injuries in the last five years, including those from cows. One former patient can tell you it's no laughing matter when you're charged or crushed by a cow. See the story about his run-in with a cow

  • Alegent Creighton Health Creighton University Medical Center then called Saint Joseph had a trauma center long before other hospitals considered one. Read more about the history of our trauma center

  • Falling TVs can injure, even kill. 2011 was one of the worst years on record with one child dying every three weeks in the United States from a falling TV.

  • "Next Generation 911" will allow people to send text messages and pictures and video chat with 911 and other emergency dispatch centers. The technology will also allow paramedics to send photos from the scene to the trauma team, to help them be better prepared.

  • lf trauma centers had existed in 1865 when President Abraham Lincoln was shot in the head, he more than likely would have survived. At an annual conference, trauma experts evaluated Lincoln's injuries and concluded that he would have lived though he would have been disabled, unable to articulate and partially blind. Physicians determined that with today's fast EMT transport, breathing tubes, CAT scans and trauma specialists, Lincoln would have been able to think and to communicate eventually after rehabilitation. Read how President Lincoln could have survived his injury.